There is a lot to wonder about in the issue of methyl mercury contamination in seafood. We do have some facts which are widely accepted. 

1) Younger fish have had less time to take in contaminants from their food chain so in general they will have lower levels of mercury ,etc. in their meat.

2) Younger fish are smaller and so their forage species are both younger and smaller (and lower in mercury) than what larger predators consume (Bio magnification.)

3) Methyl Mercury in the high seas food chain is a consequence of an atmospheric phenomenon and so is not local and so not avoidable.

4) There is a shortage of research to associate tuna consumption with mercury impact on public health.

5) It is likely that as time progresses, the mercury contamination level will respond negatively to the continued introduction of mercury from coal fired power plants.

6) The effect of mercury consumption may vary greatly in individuals, more research is needed.

Many informed people are concerned that the parameters for allowable consumption are inadequate protection for the most vulnerable people

Joseph and Joyce Malley St Jude tuna

August 2019

February 2018           View the mercury test results (PDF)

October 22, 2016

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June 4, 2015
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July 1, 2010
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June 1, 2009
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May 15, 2008
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April 18, 2008
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April 20, 2007
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April 20, 2006
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Photo by Clare Barboza

Photo by Diane Padys